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#1 mr red

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 08:25 PM

Some people that can trace their ancestry to countries that are members of the EU, as it stands one would obviously have to first acquire citizenship of that respective country through whatever process that country has in place and of course assuming they meet the qualifiying criteria.

I have heard of several people from Brazil who've had Italian or Portuguese grand parents that have gone on to get Italian and Portuguese passports and then eventually UK residency.

Has anyone, not necessarily from Brazil but any other country and who has any other ancestry (in most cases either first or second generation-parents or grandparents) e.g Spanish, Polish, French, Greek, German, Danish, Swedish etc had any experinces in this that they would be able to share and advise on it?



#2 Victoria

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 09:12 PM

You are asking an extremely wide question. What is the purpose? Do you have some ancestry you think may help you to get an EEA citizenship?

#3 Gentleman of Leisure

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 10:00 PM

Most countries do not permit nationality to be passed beyond one generation where the birth is outside the national territory. Italy appears to be the exception to this and will allow citizenship to be passed on without limit but only if each child claims their Italian nationality. Also, if the chain is broken then nationality can't be passed on. Unfortunately a lot of people who have Italian ancestors find that their parents or grand-parents did not claim their Italian citizenship or renounced it, and therefore can't pass this on.

Possibly alone in this respect, Italy bestows citizenship jure sanguinis. There is no limit of generations for the citizenship via blood, but the Italian ancestor born in Italian territories before 1861 had to die after 1861 anywhere (in Italian territory or abroad) but without losing the Italian citizenship before death in order to being able to continue the jure sanguinis chain. This is required because 1861 is the year that the Unification of the Italian territory took place. Another constraint is that each descendant of the ancestor through whom citizenship is claimed jure sanguinis can pass on citizenship only if they were a citizen at the time of the birth of the person to whom they are passing it. So, if one person in the chain renounces or otherwise loses their Italian citizenship, then has a child, that child is not an Italian citizen jure sanguinis.

#4 Mutly

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 12:40 PM

Most countries do not permit nationality to be passed beyond one generation where the birth is outside the national territory.


Almost all European countries do and not doing so is a British idea originally linked to being a subject of the crown by birth in the realm and then to reduce the number of British citizens outside the UK in former colonies. Other countries which don't are often former colonies themselves.

Has anyone, not necessarily from Brazil but any other country and who has any other ancestry (in most cases either first or second generation-parents or grandparents) e.g Spanish, Polish, French, Greek, German, Danish, Swedish etc had any experinces in this that they would be able to share and advise on it?


What will vary widely with such questions is when married women and when unmarried men could pass on citizenship.

In countries with a ban on multiple citizenship it is also necessary to check whether an ascendant lost citizenship by naturalisation in another country or by marriage or by military service there etc. If this happened whilst the person in the next generation was a minor it is necessary to check whether loss of citizenship extended to them.

You have to look in detail at all countries from which you have ancestors.

Italy had a ban on multiple citizenship before 1992, it is necessary that no ancestor lost Italian citizenship. It was one of the first countries to allow married women to pass on citizenship in 1949.

You also need to check any registration requirements which may need to be met for successive generations to acquire citizenship.

Only children and grandchildren of Irish born persons are automatically Irish citizens or can become citizens. For further generations born outside Ireland the parent has to be registered on the foreign birth register before the next generation is born. However this wasn't always thwe case.

The Scandinavian countries have a requirement that citizens born outside the country and who have never spent extended periods there and have another citizenship lose citizenship at age 22 unless they apply to retain it. Precise rules vary between the countries.

Some countries have simplified naturalisation procedures for those with descent from that country.

#5 mr red

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 09:00 PM

Thanks for the very informed responses, I'm asking all this because my grandfather (on my mother's side) was Greek and as far as I understand it Greek nationality can infact be passed on to the grandchildren regardless of whether the parent/ parents claimed Greek ciitzenship or not (I am not 100% sure about this as i have only read it on an internet forum on Greek nationality). I will be visiting the Greek embassy here in London to get a bit more info on the same. However as it stands the application process (if i do meet the criteria) will have to be done from my country of permanent residence this is laid out clearly on the Greek consular webpage. 6 month to a year military service is apparently also a requirement as mentioned on the Greek nationality forum I read but have yet to confirm this with the consular.

#6 Victoria

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 09:06 PM

Why not just ask about Greece in your initial question?

#7 mr red

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 09:08 PM

Its a forum for Christ's sake other people might have other experiences that they might just want to share

#8 Victoria

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 09:24 PM

Yes. But it would have been of use if you had stated the country in which you were interested in the first place. You might have even got more relevent replies if you had.

#9 mr red

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 07:30 AM

Yes. But it would have been of use if you had stated the country in which you were interested in the first place. You might have even got more relevent replies if you had.


Point taken, you are right. My apologies for my harsh reply.




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