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Eea Family Permit For Non Eea Parents‏

Family permit for parents

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#1 Xpatriate

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 07:45 PM

Hello,

I need advice on bringing my parents to UK.
I went through home office website and I came across one category which I find the closest to apply for and that is:
"EEA family permits for family members (http://www.ukba.home...-family-permit/)"

My father and mother live in a non EU country. They are both retired civil servants and get some pension and they have their own house where they live. Neither me nor any of my brothers/sisters live in that country any more.

I have been living and working in Netherlands for last 6 years and I'll become a Dutch citizen in another five months. My parents visited me last year and stayed here in NL for three months on schengen visa.

I am planning to move to UK after getting Dutch passport because I have few relatives and friends living there and because I intend to have my parents living with me in UK (Dutch govt. simply does not allow parents to come for anything other than visiting). Although, I have no set up in UK at this time but I'll find a job and living place before moving to UK.

Now my questions are:
Can I apply for their EEA family permit (right after receiving dutch nationality)?
Can I apply for their family permit through British embassy in Pakistan while I'm in NL with the job and house in NL instead of UK?
How will I have to prove that they are dependent on me? Do I really need such dependency proof?
How much minimum amount of money should I be sending them every month (via western union or bank transfer)? How many months of proof would I need in order to apply for their family permit?
On one (http://www.ukba.home...cuments-family/) of the pages it states: If you are the non-European family member of an EEA or Swiss national, and you have come to the UK with them, you can apply for a residence card. What does this mean? Will they apply for the residence card at UK embassy in their home land or will they apply for one in UK after going there? In that case, how will they go there in the first instance?

I desparetly want them to be living with me so that I could look after them. Please guide me how to accomplish this.

Regards..



#2 Victoria

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 07:53 PM

You must show that you are supporting them financially, and that they rely on you for the majority of their financial support. So it is not just about how much you send them, it is about whether they are reliant on that money.

#3 Xpatriate

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 10:34 AM

Thanks for your reply...

That's one of the main things that I'm trying to find details about. How would I proof that they depend/rely on me for the majority of their financial support? What sort of things/documents I would need to provide as proof of the financial support. How long should they have been mainly relying on me before I could apply for their family permits?

Regards...

#4 Victoria

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 10:46 AM

These are questions which should be addressed to an advisor. But in the first instance, how much do you send them? How much do they need for their support?

#5 Xpatriate

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:43 AM

I don't send them a fixed amount on regular basis. So far, I've been sending them money only when they asked me or when I saw that they would be in need of money. For example, for their house repair, for buying a used car, or for paying lawyers fee (there have been few Land related cases/issues), for UPS, computer etc. Me and/or my brother send them money for things other than food and/or cloths because they don't have any savings and they can get very basic things though their own pension. If they will have to go to the hospital for an operation they won't have money for that. So in that case either me or my brother will send them money.

How would the home office or immigration department judge, how much my parents need for living? and what will they consider as the sufficient evidence of my supporting them?

Instead of sending them more money upon requirement, I can start sending them less money regularly. But again I don't know what is to be gethered as the proof...

#6 Victoria

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:49 AM

It is not a case of the UKBA judging how much your parents need, it is a case of you proving how much they need, and proving that they don't have it without your help.

Having said "they can get very basic things though their own pension" then my guess is that they cannot qualify, as they are not truly dependent on you.

#7 Xpatriate

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 12:11 PM

My be it's better that I consult someone in person. Then I will know exactly how and what to be used as proof and how to come up with something that appears correct and acceptable.

#8 Victoria

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 12:31 PM

You are consulting with an OISC advisor, who has made several of these applications. You can certainly come to see me to discuss this if you wish. But do be aware that the UKBA scrutinise these applications. I do not think that your parents are dependent upon you for their day to day living costs, and that means that they do not qualify. The UKBA will see this.

If you are asking for assistance with manipulating the evidence so that it looks as though they do qualify, I am afraid that you are asking in the wrong place.

#9 Xpatriate

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 01:16 PM

You could be right that I might end up getting assistance from someone with manipulating the evidence so that it looks as though they do qualify....

They are both around 65 years of age and we like to live with our parents under one roof (unlike european/white people) and we like to take care of them (not just by sending greeting cards on certain occasions to old homes) all the time in every possible way. They both have high blood pressue and they take medicines all the time to try and keep it normal. My father recently had paralysis attack. He is still recovering from that. He also has irregular heart beat because of which he has been admitted in emergency lately. I'm not going to visit them (formally with a bunch of flowers) on their funeral.

I will apply for their permit in any case and If I don't succeed in bringing them here then I'll simply join them at their place.

#10 Victoria

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 01:21 PM

"You could be right that I might end up getting assistance from someone with manipulating the evidence so that it looks as though they do qualify...."

That would, of course, not work, and it would be illegal to try. As you will not be a UK national, to make a fraudulent application on their behalf would jeopardise your stay in the UK.

However, with medical problems there may be a lawful way to apply for them. I suggest that you see a legitimate advisor who will not break the law for you but who will advise you truthfully.




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