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Days Out Side The Uk


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#1 Brian1969

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:46 AM

Hi

My wife has her spouse visa now, i was just wondering how many days is she allowed out of the country for holidays etc.

We have already had 2 week in the States in November but we want to go away again next year, so would like to know how many days she is allowed.

Thanks



#2 SteveG

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:56 AM

Hi

There are no set number of permitted days' absence. Holidays won't be a problem though. I've pasted below what the UKBA say (note what they say about citizenship).

The Immigration Rules do not say that you must have been in the UK for the entire 5 years of your visa or permission to remain. Your application to settle here will be judged on its merits, taking into account your reasons for travel, the length of your absences, and whether you and your partner travelled and lived together while you were outside the UK. If you have spent a limited time abroad in connection with your job, for example, this should not count against you.
However, time spent outside the UK does make a difference to applications for British citizenship. If you apply to be naturalised as the husband, wife or civil partner of a British citizen, you must show that you have been living in the UK for the last 3 years (the 'residential qualifying period'), and that you have spent no more than 270 days outside the UK during those 3 years. Also, you must have spent no more than 90 days outside the UK in the last 12 months of the 3-year period. (We have discretion to allow absences above the normal limits in some circumstances.)



#3 Brian1969

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:59 AM

Thanks mate, we was lucky and got my wifes visa before the new rules, she has a 2 year spouse visa.
Thats good another holiday in march looks good then.

#4 SteveG

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 01:02 AM

Ah, that's good then - so yes, replace the "5 years" with "2 years" and a holiday will be no problem at all - they'll only question it if you're spending time apart in different countries.

Have a great hol :)

#5 Brian1969

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 01:30 AM

No we dont intend to spend anytime apart, so thats good.
Also only found out the other week that when we apply for ILR my wife will not only have to take the Life In the UK test, she will also have to do another English test. Is this true.

#6 SteveG

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 01:46 AM

Unfortunately, yes it is true

From October 2013, requiring all applicants for settlement to pass the Life in the UK Test and present an English language speaking and listening qualification at B1 level or above of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages unless they are exempt

From the UKBA website

It shouldn't be a major obstacle though - this is Cambridge ESOL's explanation of B1

In social and travel contexts, users at this level can buy goods in counter service shops, and order a meal in a restaurant, asking questions about the dishes on the menu and the services (such as use of credit cards) available. They can book a hotel room over the phone, and deal with most situations likely to arise while staying in a hotel. They can deal with a small number of routine situations in a bank, and ask questions about post office services. They can make a medical appointment over the phone, and give a simple explanation of a problem to a doctor, dentist or pharmacist. As tourists, they can get standard information from a Tourist Information office, and understand the main points of a guided tour, asking some simple questions for further information.

In the workplace, they can exchange opinions with colleagues as long as the topic is predictable, pass on messages and offer advice to clients within their own area of expertise.

If studying, they can ask simple questions, for example, for clarification, and take a limited part in a seminar or tutorial.


So as long as your wife has a reasonable understanding of spoken English, she should be OK.

Obviously there is likely to be a cost element though!

Edited by SteveG, 23 December 2012 - 01:47 AM.


#7 Brian1969

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 01:56 AM

Yes my wife's english is very good, it is better than mine. For her visa she had to do the toefl exam, which is very hard indeed and she pasted that.
As aways there is always a cost, this process is very expensive, by the end i reckon it will cost us about 5K

#8 SteveG

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 02:06 AM

I hear that a lot - spouses' English being better than a British citizen! To be fair, most British citizens wouldn't know many of the answers to the Life in the UK Test

#9 Brian1969

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 02:09 AM

Very funny.
Talking about the life in the uk test, is there somewhere you can learn for it or take mock tests.
Also how do you go about booking it when you are ready for it.

#10 SteveG

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 02:13 AM

You'd need to book it here http://lifeintheukte...booking_10.html


I've just found this website which seems to have mock questions http://www.theuktest.com/

This book is the official book with the questions in it (a little like the driving theory test) - it's available in most libraries as well as bookshops http://www.tsoshop.c...&trackid=002417




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