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The ppron method


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#1 ftgpmb

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Posted 27 February 2007 - 10:34 PM

This method was pointed out to us by Paul (ppron747) on this forum (hence the title) and used by my wife (Mrs ftgpmb) to successfully naturalise as a UK citizen in February 2007. ppron originally pointed out the method here: http://www.ukresiden...p...ost&p=54004

The main strength of the ppron method is for a spouse of a UK national to naturalise as a UK citizen having lived in the UK for 3 years, but without the need for Indefinite Leave to Remain.

What we did:
1. completed a Life in the UK test
2. emailed the embassy in a nearby country to inform them of our intention to submit the application to them.
3. persisted while they debated with the Home Office policy section in Liverpool as to whether they were able to accept the application there from a non-resident you don't have to be resident, only present in the country.
4. Filled in an AN(NEW)
5. Wrote a cover letter stating our case:

I hereby make application for naturalisation as a British citizen under Section 6(2) of the British Nationality Act 1981. I believe that I fulfil the requirements as follows:
1. I am of full age as evidenced by my birth certificate;
2. I am of full capacity as evidenced by my presence in person;
3. I intend to continue to live in the UK;
4. I am married to a British citizen as evidenced by my marriage certificate and the British Passport of my husband provided;
5. I meet the residence requirements as evidenced by application form and the entry and exit stamps in my passports:

I was in the UK on <3 years ago> and have been legally present there for the past 3 years
I have been absent for less than 270 days in the period since that day
I have been absent for less than 90 days in the past 12 months
I am not subject to immigration restrictions as evidenced by my presence outside of the UK, in the Republic of Ireland, on the date of application;

6. I am of good character as is evidenced by the declaration in my application form and as can be testified to by my referees; and,
7. I have sufficient knowledge of English and life in the United Kingdom as evidenced by the Pass Notification Letter of the Life in the UK Test provided.

I have completed application form AN (NEW) and submit this together with the following supporting documentation to the British Embassy in XXXX:

Current passport
Previous passport
Birth certificate
Marriage certificate
Husband's British passport
Like in the UK Test Pass Notification Letter

My husband and I both require our current passports for impending travel and I request that you make copies of these documents and return them to me.

I trust that you will be able to process this application with the details provided; however, if you have questions or require further details, please contact me at the address provided in my application form, or by telephone on +44

6. Mrs ftgpmb flew out on the morning of her appointment on 12th October 2006. Taking copies of the relevant acts and guidelines just in case.
7. The embassy took a consular fee and the application fee of 260 pounds all in local currency cash.
8. They also photocopied all the supporting documentation and returned it.
9. She returned to the UK the same day.
10. The embassy had some difficulty in getting the application pack to the Home Office in Liverpool, with one set going missing. There were also some difficulties convincing the HO that the fee had indeed been paid.
11. Once these issues were resolved, the letter notifying us of a successful application came within two weeks, dated 21st February 2007.

The circumstances of how we got into this situation:
The saga is posted here in full length (link)
We arrived in the UK in 2002 on a UK ancestry visa by virtue of my maternal grandparents; however, in the interim, I became a UK citizen (see here). This left Mrs ftgpmb in an odd situation as she was married to a UK citizen but living in the UK on a visa as a dependent of a UK ancestry visa holder. The dependent ancestry visa may even have been invalid others in this situation had been forced to start again with spousal visa followed by ILR and finally naturalization (see here) ... a costly and lengthy process. Thanks to lots of help from those on this forum, we elected to use the ppron method which meant that instead of making 3 separate applications for spousal visa, ILR followed by naturalisation, we were able to do it in one, considerably faster and cheaper! thanks ppron!


Useful documentation:
British Nationality (General) Regulations 2003
http://www.opsi.gov....03/20030548.htm
Part II, Paragraph 4 indicates the Authority to whom applications should be made if the applicant is "in" a foreign country (importance being the words "in" not "resident")

British Nationality Act 1981 Chapter 61
http://www.uniset.ca...BNA1981revd.htm
Section 6(2) - the act under which you are applying
Schedule 1 Paragraph 3(c ) the important part stating that the applicant needs to be free from restriction under immigration laws on the date of application

IND guidelines
http://www.ind.homeo...ts/nichapter18/
Chapter 18, Paragraph 18.2.2 more guidance under Section 6(2) of the act
Annex B to Chapter 18 Paragraph 7.1 clarification that people who are not in the UK are free from immigration time restrictions.

Moderators please sticky if you think this might be useful
Feel free to post any questions that aren't answered in the other discussion posts.



#2 JAJ

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 02:45 AM

Very useful post. A few additional comments:

1. Spouse must be a British citizen. It will not work if the spouse is an Irish citizen (not also a British citizen), ROA holder, or permanent resident (eg settled EEA/Swiss citizen).

2. Applicant must be legally married to a British citizen, or in a civil partnership. Unmarried partners cannot use this facility.

3. As noted, many British missions overseas do not understand the facility to apply for naturalisation through them. It is essential to make arrangements in advance (to ensure they will accept the application) before applying in order to avoid a wasted journey. The original poster applied through the British Embassy, Dublin.

4. Depending on nationality, if the selected British mission is in a neighbouring country, a visa may be needed for the non-British spouse to travel there. This includes travelling to the Republic of Ireland.

5. The British spouse does not have to accompany the spouse to the "other" country (however the applicant must travel to that country).

6. Application may be made at any British diplomatic mission. If applying in a neighbouring country is not practical, then application at the British mission in home country should be possible.

7. The British diplomatic mission does not decide the application. Their only role is to forward it to the Home Office IND in Liverpool.

8. Although not apparently necessary in this case, it is probably advisable for the applicant spouse to spend the entire day (midnight to midnight) of application in the "other" country.

9. A citizenship ceremony must still take place for British citizenship to become effective. This will normally be arranged through the local authority in the UK (or Northern Ireland Office) as normal.

Moderator note : Please do not "hijack" this thread. Unrelated questions will be deleted.

#3 Victoria

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Posted 28 February 2007 - 09:47 AM

Can I also add that the three year period of stay in the UK prior to application must have been legal, although can be on any basis, including visitor.


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#4 JAJ

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 12:58 AM

5. Wrote a cover letter stating our case:

[size=1]I hereby make application for naturalisation as a British citizen under Section 6(2) of the British Nationality Act 1981. I believe that I fulfil the requirements as follows:
1. I am of full age as evidenced by my birth certificate;
2. I am of full capacity as evidenced by my presence in person;
3. I intend to continue to live in the UK;


Incidentally the requirement to "continue to intend to live in the UK" does not apply to section 6(2) naturalisation applicants (spouses of British citizens).

#5 ftgpmb

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 06:25 PM

A little postscript to this story. Seems that the HO has seen fit to send the citizenship certificate back to the consulate in Dublin - despite the fact that the home address on the form is in the UK! We've had to apply for and pay for a change of venue. Something to note for others applying to make clear in their covering note perhaps.

Also, I got the fees wrong in my description, it was 280 Euro. Anyway, this is out of date as it will probably gone up with the new fee structure.

#6 JAJ

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 07:35 PM

A little postscript to this story. Seems that the HO has seen fit to send the citizenship certificate back to the consulate in Dublin - despite the fact that the home address on the form is in the UK! We've had to apply for and pay for a change of venue. Something to note for others applying to make clear in their covering note perhaps.


The alternative is to just make the trip back to Dublin for the citizenship ceremony (which may suit some people, and avoid the delay of changing the ceremony venue).

Is your wife still waiting on a ceremony date?

#7 anon

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 04:29 PM

A little postscript to this story. Seems that the HO has seen fit to send the citizenship certificate back to the consulate in Dublin - despite the fact that the home address on the form is in the UK! We've had to apply for and pay for a change of venue. Something to note for others applying to make clear in their covering note perhaps.

Also, I got the fees wrong in my description, it was 280 Euro. Anyway, this is out of date as it will probably gone up with the new fee structure.


Ftgpmb, Does it mean that now your wife can apply for a British passport, after being naturalised, without ever having an ILR to live in the UK? And why did she travel to Ireland and not another country if I may ask? And can you travel to any other country in Europe or abroad?
Thanks, Anon.

#8 scotchal

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 12:46 PM

Hi, would I be right in thinking that the only form required is AN(AFD) located http://www.ind.homeo.../anform2007.pdf ?
Thanks, AL.

#9 John

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 02:15 PM

Yes, that is the correct form ..... certainly at the moment! (But anyone reading this noticeably after the date I post this should check with the BIA website before proceeding.)

#10 ftgpmb

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 07:55 PM

Ftgpmb, Does it mean that now your wife can apply for a British passport, after being naturalised, without ever having an ILR to live in the UK? And why did she travel to Ireland and not another country if I may ask? And can you travel to any other country in Europe or abroad?
Thanks, Anon.

Yes - that's the main idea of the ppron method is naturalisation without ILR. Ireland was the cheapest nearest, but anyone would do.

Final update - finally got the ceremony transfered and booked here in Nottingham on the 4th July. Have the passport in my hand now. We are leaving for a trip to Sardinia this weekend both on our shiney new UK passports! hooray! Thanks again everyone.




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