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The (likely) end of UK ancestry


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#1 London_Lad

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 06:23 PM

Points 129-130 (p. 23-4) of the green paper signal the first death toll for UK ancestry. Within the brave new world of economic-or-family migrants, good old Ancestry is an odd-man out.

www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/aboutus/consultations/pathtocitizenship/pathtocitizenship?view=Binary

I have no idea what this means for those already in the country on the visa. Will they have to switch to some other category? Will there be some transitional arrangements. I don't know...but if you care about this, you should make your voice heard by responding to the consultation.

www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/aboutus/consultations/pathtocitizenship/citizenshipproforma?view=Binary



#2 alvon

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 09:10 PM

Extract from the Green Paper consultation document

"129. We also need to determine the position of the ‘UK ancestry’ and ‘retired persons of independent means’ routes within the new system.
130. The UK ancestry provisions were introduced in 1972 and allow a Commonwealth citizen, aged 17 or over, to come to the UK provided he is able to show that one of his grandparents was born in the UK and that he intends to take or seek employment in the UK. This route currently provides an avenue to settlement after five years, in line with existing employment routes. Those entering under the UK ancestry route have free access to the labour market on entry. Given that the proposed immigration system provides explicit routes to the UK for those coming as economic migrants, family members or refugees, we need to decide whether a Commonwealth national’s ancestral connections to the UK are sufficient to allow them to come here to work without the need to satisfy a resident labour market test. We are therefore asking this question as part of the consultation contained within this paper. We will take the results of the consultation exercise into account before coming to a decision."

"Chapter 3 ‘Three routes to citizenship and three stages in the journey’
.
4. Do you think the ‘UK ancestry’ route should be abolished?"

#3 London_Lad

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 09:23 PM

Alvon, I posted the same thing already! Arghhhh...

;-)

#4 alvon

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 09:30 PM

Alvon, I posted the same thing already! Arghhhh...

;-)


Hi LL - I guess what's on many minds right now is whether or not these bastards are going to act retrospectively as they did with the 4/5 year change.

I have to be honest - we've given a lot to this country and have been glad of the privilege of being here, but I'm reaching the point where it is enough. They can look for my skills elsewhere - time to start planning a life in another place. But that's what they want I suppose.

Just read your post - I agree that people need to comment. Remember how they claimed full consultation when they changed from 4 to 5 years for ancestry as well?

#5 Birkin5454

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 11:05 AM

Well put Alvon, I completely agree.

The government has been looking to get rid of Commonwealth visa links for a long time. Never mind the fact a large majority of us have a long family line and direct link to Britain (in my case both my grandparents are British) and have not only high profile employment, but have invested heavily in properties and businesses. I am sure the high percentage burden on public health service and schooling comes from sources other than Ancestry Visa holders. I am thankful for the opportunities afforded to me, but I know when enough is enough. Not only is the government looking to damage investment in the country by taxing non-domicile status, it is now pushing to severe its links with the Commonwealth completely.

This does bring into question whether it is feasible to push for the 5 year extension on the end of a 4 year visa. I am considering now one year and straight to ILR, as to not get caught in the resulting and most likely to occur retrospective change. Or, alternatively pack up and leave, which is as you say, what they want.

#6 Mea

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Posted 22 February 2008 - 12:42 PM

This is quite upsetting! I studied in the UK in 2004-2005 and vowed to move there some day. I finished uni and now I'm halfway through my plan of teaching in Korea for 2 years in order to save up for a UK move! I don't know what I'd do if they got rid of the AV - all my career and grad school plans revolve around the UK. :mellow:

I remember I got all worried about this in 2005 and they didn't get rid of it then - that should make me feel better but it doesn't...

#7 vinny

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 05:08 PM

See also UK considers scrapping ancestry visas.

#8 Essentials

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 06:29 PM

I hope I'm allowed to ask this here, considering it pertains to ancestry visas and the possibility of their end.

Is there any point in me continuing to pursue an ancestry visa if they're planning on getting rid of them in the near future? I should be sending off the application within the next couple of months, but is it a good idea if they may just get rid of the entire visa? This whole thing is worrying me a little bit.

Edited by Essentials, 01 April 2008 - 06:30 PM.


#9 JAJ

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 03:15 AM

It may well still be a good idea to obtain one as there would likely be some kind of transitional arrangements for existing AV holders, even if it is closed to new applicants.

It is noteworthy that Australia, Canada and New Zealand do not have an "ancestry visa" to assist those descended from their citizens who emigrated to the U.K.

#10 London_Lad

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 03:14 PM

JAJ said:

It is noteworthy that Australia, Canada and New Zealand do not have an "ancestry visa" to assist those descended from their citizens who emigrated to the U.K.

I can't speak for Australia or New Zealand, but Canada is much more generous that the UK in terms of an equivalent ancestry visa. For the UK, only the first generation born abroad is (generally) considered British. The second generation (and only if also a Commonwealth citizen!) must apply for a limited-leave visa before perhaps becoming a UK citizen after six years residence.

Lovely, generous Canada currently extends citizenship to the second generation born abroad, whether or not they are also a Commonwealth citizen. All Canada asks is that said person spends one year of his/her life before turning 28 in Canada to re-establish their Canadian ties. I think this is more munificent than the UK Ancestry programme.

But, and there's always a but, Canada is now considering limiting citizenship by descent in the future to only the first generation born abroad. In which case, circa 2013...the UK and Canada may be equals in terms of their recognition of ancestral ties.

For more information: http://www.cic.gc.ca...ship/retain.asp




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