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Immigration At Heathrow


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#11 matrix

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 11:19 PM

Relative of any sorts residing in the UK does not impede to entry to UK. For example, I have been living in the UK and I have sponsored my parents, brothers, sisters several times and they managed to get visa in first attempt. In one occassion, they forgot to bring sponsorship documents and did not remember my address but they had my telephone no. That was sufficient for IO at Heathrow.

I would recommend to be honest and tell excatly truth. It will be fine.

Good luck!!



#12 midtownguy

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 01:24 PM

These are the rules posted on the BIA homeoffice website for GENERAL visitors - I am not sure how it works for WHM but those are also considered visitors - and this link clearly states that visitors to UK "do not intend to marry or form a civil partnership or give notice of marriage or civil partnership;"

I have also seen some clips on youtube where people who said they had a GF or BF in UK upon arrival were unneccessarily suspected and harassed by immigration officers and some even refused entry on the suspicion they are coming to join their partners. Its probably better for your girlfriend to just say she is coming on her WHM and wants to experience living in the UK for a bit... and that she just has a few good friends there already. If she mentions the word BF - they might start questioning her for no reason... and especially if she cannot prove very strong ties to her home country such as properties, job, business and investments etc.. then they would have more reasons to trouble her.

http://www.bia.homeo...rs/eligibility/

This page explains how you can come to the United Kingdom as a general visitor.

If you are a national of the European Economic Area (EEA) or a member of their family see the for European citizens section.

To come to the United Kingdom as a general visitor you must be able to show that you:

only want to visit the United Kingdom for up to six months;
plan to leave the United Kingdom at the end of your visit;
have enough money to support and accommodate yourself without working, help from public funds or you will be supported and accommodated by relatives or friends;
do not intend to charge members of the public for services provided or goods received;
do not intend to study; and
can meet the cost of the return or onward journey.
do not intend to carry out business, sport or entertainer visitor activities;
do not intend to marry or form a civil partnership or give notice of marriage or civil partnership;
do not intend to receive private medical treatment during your visit , and
are not in transit to a country outside the Common Travel Area.
If you want to do business during your visit you also have to show that you:

normally live and work abroad and you have no plans to base yourself in the United Kingdom; and
do not plan to work, produce goods or provide services in the United Kingdom.
For further information on your rights and responsibilities as a general visitor see the rights and responsibilities section

#13 snootay

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 10:48 PM

YMS is in the Working section of the UK border agency site...

See what I mean, so many conflicting opinions.

From every Australian who has gone to the UK as a WHM, they tell me that you usually only get hassled by immigration in the UK as an aussie if you DON'T have a visa that allows you to work. Particularly now that the YMS allows you to work for the full 2 years of the visa. they are usually worried that people trying to get in on holiday visas are trying to get into the UK to work illegally.

She will probably be asked on what basis she is coming to the UK, to which she will respond "Youth Mobility Scheme". They will then ask her how long she intends to say, to which she will say "two years" (which she is allowed to do, so no problem there, so the six month visitor obligation doesnt count). They may ask what type of work she will be looking for and if she is travelling with anyone, but any answers she gives to those questions will be kind of inconsequential, and me having a british passport is no reason to stop her entering either. It states that you can travel on the YMS with your partner as long as he/she qualifies for a YMS visa or another working visa, so I don't see why she should be punished just because I have a British passport.

Edited by snootay, 26 February 2009 - 10:50 PM.


#14 snootay

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 11:03 PM

"DEPENDANTS: Not permitted.
In addition, the applicant must not have any children under the age
of 18 who are either living with him/her or for whom he/she is
financially responsible. Applicants who are married or have partners
may participate in the YMS. Although spouses or partners of YMS
participants may not enter the United Kingdom as dependants, they may
enter if they qualify and obtain entry clearance in their own right under
the YMS, or qualify for entry in another capacity."

#15 Aussie19

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 03:56 AM

"DEPENDANTS: Not permitted.
In addition, the applicant must not have any children under the age
of 18 who are either living with him/her or for whom he/she is
financially responsible. Applicants who are married or have partners
may participate in the YMS. Although spouses or partners of YMS
participants may not enter the United Kingdom as dependants, they may
enter if they qualify and obtain entry clearance in their own right under
the YMS, or qualify for entry in another capacity."


Sure, but remember this quote is referring to people whose partners live with them in their home country (ie, two aussies who are a couple coming over on separate visas). While it is still technically acceptable what you are doing, and most likely you won't run into any trouble, they may question you and there is a slight possibility of refusal as your girlfriend is Australian coming to see and be with YOU, a British citizen, giving her a strong intent to overstay.

So they may class her as a potential overstayer, so be prepared.

I myself am in a similar boat; my girlfriend is a British citizen. Last time I got in alright, but they did question and search me. I was completely honest, and all was ok. I think it was to do with money issues predominantly; but there are cases where they will pull you up on it, but usually, like in my case, there has to be other red alarms as well. Worse thing to do, and I have heard of people being sent home for it, is to say "I'm staying with a friend" and later on reveal to them they are your boyfriend. That's counted as lying, and you will be on the next flight home.

However, as your girlfriend already has Entry Clearance (a visa), then the chances of this happening are again reduced. I would say the only problems you will have is if you lie or seem to be withholding information; however, she didn't have to mention you anywhere on the visa form, did she? So I may be wrong on this :P

All in all, everything should be ok, but there is always a possibility.

Keep praying for me also, I am still eagerly awaiting for my visa to come back; and I had to state on the application that I had previously been over to the UK to visit my girlfriend.

#16 snootay

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 04:08 AM

Yeah mate, good luck!!!

Only planning to stay for a few months to meet my Mum and friends and then come back here. She's got her uni to send her a letter saying that she is defering for a semester too. Think everything should be ok as long as, as you say, we don't try to decieve them with the "She's just a friend" option.

Plus, my Dad is an Australian resident and I live in his house. Have no intention of remaining in the UK at all

#17 Aussie19

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 04:45 AM

Yeah mate, good luck!!!

Only planning to stay for a few months to meet my Mum and friends and then come back here. She's got her uni to send her a letter saying that she is defering for a semester too. Think everything should be ok as long as, as you say, we don't try to decieve them with the "She's just a friend" option.

Plus, my Dad is an Australian resident and I live in his house. Have no intention of remaining in the UK at all


So you are Australian too, but with a British passport? Could you legally live in Britain if you wanted to? I was more concerned about your girlfriend being a potential overstayer. Is she Australian?

If you both are unable to legally stay in the UK then you face even less risk; the threat then passes to you, who may potentially overstay to live with your Mum. However, I'm pretty sure that's a moot point; though is a bit out of my league of knowledge.

All in all, if I was a gambler, I would easy put $500 down on you getting through unscathed :):):)

God bless!

#18 snootay

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 05:05 AM

Yeah mate, good luck!!!

Only planning to stay for a few months to meet my Mum and friends and then come back here. She's got her uni to send her a letter saying that she is defering for a semester too. Think everything should be ok as long as, as you say, we don't try to decieve them with the "She's just a friend" option.

Plus, my Dad is an Australian resident and I live in his house. Have no intention of remaining in the UK at all


So you are Australian too, but with a British passport? Could you legally live in Britain if you wanted to? I was more concerned about your girlfriend being a potential overstayer. Is she Australian?

If you both are unable to legally stay in the UK then you face even less risk; the threat then passes to you, who may potentially overstay to live with your Mum. However, I'm pretty sure that's a moot point; though is a bit out of my league of knowledge.

All in all, if I was a gambler, I would easy put $500 down on you getting through unscathed :) :) :)

God bless!


No, no, I'm not an Australian (yet). GF is Australian (tried to get an Italian passport as her Dad is from there but they have stupid rules on ancestory). My Dad is an Australian resident, but he isn't a citizen (he's from Zimbabwe, but thats besides the point). I am British through my Mum's side, although my first British passport was issued in South Africa... Consider myself Zimbabwean more than anything else as I grew up there but obviously, travel is much easier with a British passport so my parents got me one when I was too old to stay on my Mums.

The idea of us going over there is that we want to experience British life and see my Mum (who I haven't seen in two years) before coming back to Australia for good (well, until I get residency). I'm assuming that will all sound good in any possible immigration phone call I may recieve?!

Argh, I'm just an eternal worrier. Sorry to go into detail here, but in my youth I had a one night stand and even though I used protection I convinced myself that I caught HIV or some other nasty virus and spent days and days searching the internet for symptoms. Now I'm worrying about this when there should be nothing to worry about, blasted internet diagnosing - she'll probably get waived through no bother.

#19 snootay

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 04:42 PM

POST IMMIGRATION UPDATE

We were ****ing ourselves, but as it turns out, she got through immigration before I did!

Her immigration interview went like this:

"So whats purpose of your visit?" (Carribean accent)

"Holiday" (in high pitched Aussie voice)

Passport stamped and she was sent on her way.

#20 mira

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Posted 04 March 2009 - 02:13 PM

do the immigration officers record your answers on their system when they start questioning you at heathrow airport? (just wanted to see if what you currently say on entry at heathrow to the immigration officer isn't linked to what you say on your future visits. ie. will they have things on file?)




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